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Working on it

Minor update

Not a huge amount of progress on Fenchurch this week, because I was away on business for most of it.

Yesterday I flatted down the zinc primer on Fenchurch's wings and applied filler to the places where I welded up the holes in them, then I cut the remains of the bottom panel off her driver's door. When I turned the door the right way up again, a huge pile of rust fell out along with some more of the funny yellow fibrous stuff a previous owner had squirted into various rusty areas of the bodywork (I'm still not sure why - if anything it would trap water and make it rust quicker). A bit of wire-brushing revealed that the bottom of the outer skin is worse than it looked - the only sign from the outside was a row of rust bubbles, but the metal had rotten from the inside out and the bubbles were where it had gone right through and only the paint was covering up the holes. Luckily only the bottom three inches or so are affected. I'm going to buy a couple of commercial repair panels for the outer skin and bottom panel to save time (the curved parts of the outer skin would be very difficult to get right if I made the repair panels myself). I expect this will be the trickiest weld repair I've done so far, because the finished seam doesn't just need to be strong but it also needs to be invisible after I've painted over it.

Today I started cleaning up a bit upstairs (the place looks like a bomb-site at the moment), and then I removed Fenchurch's sliding rear windows. I need to replace the rotten old felt-lined channels anyway (AKA window boxes because you tend to get moss growing in them after a while), and taking the old ones off now will make it easier for me to treat the woodwork around them. I was glad to see that the wood under the channels is in pristine condition - apparently some vehicles suffer badly from rot in this area because the drain holes under the channels can get blocked up and if that happens they fill with water that just sits there and soaks into the top of the waist rail.

Working on removing the windows while sitting in the boot brought back to me just how much space there is in the back of a Traveller. Given a soft pad to lie on, you could quite comfortably sleep in it (with legs curled up, obviously - it's not long enough to stretch out fully). If I needed to break up a journey but didn't want to pay for a hotel room, I might be tempted to do that rather than mess about with finding a campsite and pitching a tent. One slight drawback with the scheme is the complete lack of privacy due to being surrounded by huge uncurtained windows.

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John sometimes sleeps in the Volvo, and has a complicated arrangement consisting of a huge piece of cheap dark thick fabric, string and bulldog clips.